CLOSING SOON: Paris Refashioned, 1957-1968 at the FIT Museum

April 15 is the last day to see the standout show “Paris Refashioned, 1957-1968” curated by Colleen Hill at the Museum at FIT (closed Sundays and Mondays; admission is free). It’s a fascinating look at how the birth of ready-to-wear in France changed the fashion industry in ways that are still being felt today. As the market for …

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Met Museum Makes Trove of Images Available to Public

Thomas P. Campbell, director of the Met, announced yesterday that the museum will make images of public-domain artworks in its collection available for free and unrestricted use. This is a real boon to bloggers, journalists, artists, and Internet users in general. Called Open Access, this policy uses the Creative Commons Zero designation and makes over 375,000 …

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What Does a Cost-Benefit Analysis of Art Look Like?

In the New York Times yesterday, economist Robert H. Frank attempts to apply a cost-benefit analysis to one of the most iconic works in the collection of the Detroit Institute of Arts, The Wedding Dance by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. He thinks it would be great idea to sell it. But this approach is wrong — …

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City as Canvas, the Portrait of an Era

Seeing “City as Canvas” at the Museum of the City of New York, which opened yesterday and is up through August 24, was an unexpectedly rewarding, and even moving, experience. Not so much because of the quality of the art, some of which I was disappointed by, but because the show is so clearly a …

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Do We Need “Art as Therapy”?

Alain de Botton has written a book titled “Art as Therapy” and now, along with art historian John Armstrong, will write new captions for 150 works in Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum that will be on view from April 25 to September 7, according to the Art Newspaper. The museum says that the captions are intended to “confront …

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The Morgan Library Will Put Its Drawings Online

The Morgan Library announced last week that it will put its entire drawings collection online by October 2014. The collection ranges from the 14th to the 21st centuries and is especially strong in Italian Renaissance works, as well as in French, British, Dutch, Flemish, and German drawings. This is exciting news both for scholars and …

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